This only goes to show just how gross ketchup really is…
lickystickypickywe:

Ketchup—the national condiment of 1896, according to the New York Tribune—wasn’t always tomato based. In fact, if it had remained in its early form, we might be spreading fish paste on our burgers (gulp) instead of the tangy tomato-y goodness we presently rely on.
Somewhere along the line ketchup went through a grand transformation, which made it synonymous with the tomato. And today Heinz alone sells 650 million bottles of the special sauce annually.
It all started with anchovies (of course!). The first English reference to “katchop” was in the book, Compleat Housewife [sic], published in 1727, which contained directions for a sauce spun from “twelve to fourteen anchovies, ten to twelve shallots, white wine vinegar, white wine…mace, ginger, cloves, whole peppers, a whole nutmeg, lemon peel, and horseradish.” Way back it was more like a fish sauce than our condiment today… Cookbook authors were reprinting the above recipe well into the 19th century.
The sauce likely made its way to England by way of British explorers in Southeast Asia. Mushroom and walnut varieties along with red pepper-, grape-, and oyster-based ketchups got quite a bit of play on the English recipe book circuit. Ketchup was a hit. One of the reasons that it did so well its high concentration of salt and vinegar: The stuff could sit on the shelf for a long time, a bonus before the age of refrigerators. Since ketchup could apparently be made with whatever, tomatoes finally got their shot at the sauce in the first half of the 18th century.
In the 1820s commercial ketchup bottling (the tomato kind) began in the US. What was stocked on the shelves, though, still didn’t look like what’s stocked in diners today. Since yellow and green tomatoes were not easily canned, they were tossed in the mix with the red ones destined for ketchup. But the mixed bag led to a muddy brown concoction in the bottle. It was clear ketchup still needed to come into its own.
Heinz started selling ketchup commercially in 1876. Fifteen years later, recipes for the homemade version had largely disappeared from cookbooks. Heinz’s in-house magazine, namedPickles, explained in 1901 the appeal of the ready-made:

“He little knows how fortunate he is to have been born a generation or so late, and to have escaped the miseries of scouring…kettles to brassy brightness, the primitive manner of fruit-picking, the boiling of jellies and the parboiling of his face and hands as he stirred, stirred and constantly stirred the catsup [sic] to keep it from burning.”

With all the effort it took to make by hand, combined with the fact that ketchup was one of the first packaged foods, it’s no wonder bottled ketchup was pretty popular from the get-go.
But in 1930, the food scientists at Heinz started wondering if they could get more from their tomatoes. What they wanted was more consistency, so they developed a tomato-breeding program to attempt to take more control of their product.

This only goes to show just how gross ketchup really is…

lickystickypickywe:

Ketchup—the national condiment of 1896, according to the New York Tribune—wasn’t always tomato based. In fact, if it had remained in its early form, we might be spreading fish paste on our burgers (gulp) instead of the tangy tomato-y goodness we presently rely on.

Somewhere along the line ketchup went through a grand transformation, which made it synonymous with the tomato. And today Heinz alone sells 650 million bottles of the special sauce annually.

It all started with anchovies (of course!). The first English reference to “katchop” was in the book, Compleat Housewife [sic], published in 1727, which contained directions for a sauce spun from “twelve to fourteen anchovies, ten to twelve shallots, white wine vinegar, white wine…mace, ginger, cloves, whole peppers, a whole nutmeg, lemon peel, and horseradish.” Way back it was more like a fish sauce than our condiment today… Cookbook authors were reprinting the above recipe well into the 19th century.

The sauce likely made its way to England by way of British explorers in Southeast Asia. Mushroom and walnut varieties along with red pepper-, grape-, and oyster-based ketchups got quite a bit of play on the English recipe book circuit. Ketchup was a hit. One of the reasons that it did so well its high concentration of salt and vinegar: The stuff could sit on the shelf for a long time, a bonus before the age of refrigerators. Since ketchup could apparently be made with whatever, tomatoes finally got their shot at the sauce in the first half of the 18th century.

In the 1820s commercial ketchup bottling (the tomato kind) began in the US. What was stocked on the shelves, though, still didn’t look like what’s stocked in diners today. Since yellow and green tomatoes were not easily canned, they were tossed in the mix with the red ones destined for ketchup. But the mixed bag led to a muddy brown concoction in the bottle. It was clear ketchup still needed to come into its own.

Heinz started selling ketchup commercially in 1876. Fifteen years later, recipes for the homemade version had largely disappeared from cookbooks. Heinz’s in-house magazine, namedPickles, explained in 1901 the appeal of the ready-made:

“He little knows how fortunate he is to have been born a generation or so late, and to have escaped the miseries of scouring…kettles to brassy brightness, the primitive manner of fruit-picking, the boiling of jellies and the parboiling of his face and hands as he stirred, stirred and constantly stirred the catsup [sic] to keep it from burning.”

With all the effort it took to make by hand, combined with the fact that ketchup was one of the first packaged foods, it’s no wonder bottled ketchup was pretty popular from the get-go.

But in 1930, the food scientists at Heinz started wondering if they could get more from their tomatoes. What they wanted was more consistency, so they developed a tomato-breeding program to attempt to take more control of their product.

(via lickystickypickyshe)

Tags: history food

I haven’t eaten candy in a LOOOONG time.  I just ate some.  My taste buds almost exploded; it was soooo sweet… It was almost painful!  I think I’m not going to do that again for awhile…

I just made a scrumptious kale/lentil soup that would have brought Julia Child to her knees!… You know, if she were vegan.

agreed.

agreed.

(via readsusieread)

Tags: humor food

sunfoundation: The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats


I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton  confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can  totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

sunfoundation: The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats

I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

(via theatlantic)

Tags: books food

Just an FYI: if you send me for groceries with your credit card, auxiliary items will be purchased.  If Funyuns are on sale, they’re already in the basket.

Tags: diary humor food

Wait, snow is a condiment? >:{(& I thought vodka was a meal….) 

Wait, snow is a condiment? >:{
(& I thought vodka was a meal….) 

(Source: stream.pleated-jeans.com, via tastefullyoffensive)

Tags: humor food

More Year of Chemistry Love.  Today, yummy love.

More Year of Chemistry Love.  Today, yummy love.

(Source: thingsorganizedneatly, via orangushamstursaurus)

New code for pizza…

Me: “So, mom… Is it time to put the lime in the coconut?”
Mom: “What?”
Me: “Oh, yeah, that’s my new code for, are we having pizza tonight?”
Mom (looking quizzical): “Ok…”
Me: “You gotta roll with it.  It all makes perfect sense in my head.”

Watermelon is the yummy food of the day.  Get on board people! :)

Tags: diary food

MRI of an artichoke

super-cool (squared).

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

via Inside Insides

(Source: wildfood, via jayparkinsonmd)

My Dad is a sugar fiend…

Mom: “I’m taking the last ice cream sandwich. Your dad bought these the other day—a 12-pack—& I’m having the last one.”  She looks at me, “How many did you have?”

Me: “There were ice cream sandwiches?…”

& bypass my taste buds?  Never!

& bypass my taste buds?  Never!

(Source: alwaysbewoke)

Tags: humor food

This is a restaurant in Poznan (also, the 1st in Poland; they tell you on arrival) where you eat in the dark.  You also don’t get to order specific dishes but, instead, you choose courses and tell your waiter your limits—allergies, dietary restrictions, etc—before being escorted into a dark room to dine cave style.  An important tip is to slide your hands along the table to find the food and utensils.  It’s great!  And also very revealing.  Firstly, I noticed that I was gesturing and making facial expressions just like normal, even though I was, literally, an invisible ninja (for once)…  And, secondly, after the meal, you meet again with your waiter in a lit room and guess what you were served.  Shockingly I learned that, in the context of soup and careful cutting, I cannot tell the difference between carrots and broccoli!  Note that carrots are my favorite vegetable!!  I love these serendipitous moments when a little self-knowledge appears so unexpectedly….
Oh, & let me end this post with a shout out to ML who was my sugar momma for the evening and paid for this delicious, late birthday treat!! 

This is a restaurant in Poznan (also, the 1st in Poland; they tell you on arrival) where you eat in the dark.  You also don’t get to order specific dishes but, instead, you choose courses and tell your waiter your limits—allergies, dietary restrictions, etc—before being escorted into a dark room to dine cave style.  An important tip is to slide your hands along the table to find the food and utensils.  It’s great!  And also very revealing.  Firstly, I noticed that I was gesturing and making facial expressions just like normal, even though I was, literally, an invisible ninja (for once)…  And, secondly, after the meal, you meet again with your waiter in a lit room and guess what you were served.  Shockingly I learned that, in the context of soup and careful cutting, I cannot tell the difference between carrots and broccoli!  Note that carrots are my favorite vegetable!!  I love these serendipitous moments when a little self-knowledge appears so unexpectedly….

Oh, & let me end this post with a shout out to ML who was my sugar momma for the evening and paid for this delicious, late birthday treat!! 

Tags: polska food diary

Sometimes when you’re out at doin’ the fancy, fancy restaurant thing in Poland, you get a sweet reminder that you’re in Europe.  At the extremely tasty Madagaskar in Poznan, you should definitely go for the “decorated” table, even if you’re on a girl’s night out b/c dinning by candlelight is always so much more atmospheric...

Sometimes when you’re out at doin’ the fancy, fancy restaurant thing in Poland, you get a sweet reminder that you’re in Europe.  At the extremely tasty Madagaskar in Poznan, you should definitely go for the “decorated” table, even if you’re on a girl’s night out b/c dinning by candlelight is always so much more atmospheric...

Tags: poznan diary food